The Shoot The Bull Thread

Northern Dancer

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Thanks for your all's concern. Compressors can make very effective bombs. It removed 3 of my basement door windows and most of the window paynes in a larger window on the same wall.
It is repaired.

Northern Dancer, The shame! I can't believe you paid someone to do your school work.

Nice to see you on line Jason.
-----> Sins of the past. I never did really well in any of the shop subjects. One thing for sure - I developed a respect and admiration for tradespeople, many of whom, have come to my rescue on numerous occasions. Glad things are okay Roybrew. That was some notch out of the canoe.
 

Roybrew

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Jason, Snake guards and a machete? Wow sounds like a good outdoors job. Gator hunting? You all got them mean water moccasins down there in Florida. Here we have copper heads and rattle snakes. They don't come after you like them cotton mouths do. I have to wear safety toed shoes where I work. Lots of standing on a concrete floor. Something happened to my legs last year. I know I'm a little over weight, but my legs and knees hurt so bad I was afraid I was going to be cripple in a couple of years. I get off in the mornings and hit the sack as soon as I get home. My legs would hurt so much I would have to move them every couple of minutes till I fell asleep. I couldn't lay on my side or my knees would ache. Last fall when I was camping I couldn't sit in the canoe for very long cause my knees would hurt real bad. I would constantly move my legs back and forth. It felt better to be standing and walking then sitting. I've gone through several pairs of insoles in the past 3 months. I am pretty flat footed, so shoes, or insoles, with any type of arch kills my legs. Make sure you get boots with the foot bed that fits you feet well. A person can always get insoles with an arch support, but if your boots already have a molded in arch support there's not much you can do if it's to much.

Dancer, yep I'm a master of disaster. I'm the type of person that just jumps on into a project. Sometimes you better off paying someone else to do it. I'm getting ready to build a work shop. I've got to do some excavating and pour a concrete pad. I've never worked a concrete pad before, so I've been studying up on it. Here I go...yeehaw! I'm sure I'll mess something up, but it'll be a learning experience.
 

jason

fear no beer
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Jason, Snake guards and a machete? Wow sounds like a good outdoors job. Gator hunting? You all got them mean water moccasins down there in Florida. Here we have copper heads and rattle snakes. They don't come after you like them cotton mouths do. I have to wear safety toed shoes where I work.
I will be working for the county mosquito district. Treating ponds, swamps, flood areas etc... for mosquito larva/pupa. So lots of outdoor work, which I'm happy about, at least until my first hot day in full gear then we will see. Really happy about getting benefits again, and not worrying about being laid off, and I will have most weekends off. I am excitedly nervous as it is an lot more then the night time truck driving treating for adults.

Sorry to hear about your knees. I googled best outdoor work boots and have been trying to read as many as reviews as I can. I'm taking advantage of amazons wardrobe option too, where I can try out boots (really it covers all sorts of clothing) free for 7 days before I buy or return. Granted I've only tried two so far, and within the hour I found I didn't like them. I am between a size 12 and 13 and wide foot so it can be hard sometimes. Plus I prefer to be barefoot as much as I can. Not sure if the amazon wardrobe option would work for you or not.

I've been out in the yard all day today, and got a 2 inch book I need to learn so off to studying I go.
 

Northern Dancer

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I will be working for the county mosquito district. Treating ponds, swamps, flood areas etc... for mosquito larva/pupa. So lots of outdoor work, which I'm happy about, at least until my first hot day in full gear then we will see. Really happy about getting benefits again, and not worrying about being laid off, and I will have most weekends off. I am excitedly nervous as it is an lot more then the night time truck driving treating for adults.

Sorry to hear about your knees. I googled best outdoor work boots and have been trying to read as many as reviews as I can. I'm taking advantage of amazons wardrobe option too, where I can try out boots (really it covers all sorts of clothing) free for 7 days before I buy or return. Granted I've only tried two so far, and within the hour I found I didn't like them. I am between a size 12 and 13 and wide foot so it can be hard sometimes. Plus I prefer to be barefoot as much as I can. Not sure if the amazon wardrobe option would work for you or not.

I've been out in the yard all day today, and got a 2 inch book I need to learn so off to studying I go.
-----> That's a lot of "stuff" Jason. It will be nice to have a bit more security and I'm happy to see things going your way so to speak.
 

Northern Dancer

Well-Known Member
Messages
447
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63
Jason, Snake guards and a machete? Wow sounds like a good outdoors job. Gator hunting? You all got them mean water moccasins down there in Florida. Here we have copper heads and rattle snakes. They don't come after you like them cotton mouths do. I have to wear safety toed shoes where I work. Lots of standing on a concrete floor. Something happened to my legs last year. I know I'm a little over weight, but my legs and knees hurt so bad I was afraid I was going to be cripple in a couple of years. I get off in the mornings and hit the sack as soon as I get home. My legs would hurt so much I would have to move them every couple of minutes till I fell asleep. I couldn't lay on my side or my knees would ache. Last fall when I was camping I couldn't sit in the canoe for very long cause my knees would hurt real bad. I would constantly move my legs back and forth. It felt better to be standing and walking then sitting. I've gone through several pairs of insoles in the past 3 months. I am pretty flat footed, so shoes, or insoles, with any type of arch kills my legs. Make sure you get boots with the foot bed that fits you feet well. A person can always get insoles with an arch support, but if your boots already have a molded in arch support there's not much you can do if it's to much.

Dancer, yep I'm a master of disaster. I'm the type of person that just jumps on into a project. Sometimes you better off paying someone else to do it. I'm getting ready to build a work shop. I've got to do some excavating and pour a concrete pad. I've never worked a concrete pad before, so I've been studying up on it. Here I go...yeehaw! I'm sure I'll mess something up, but it'll be a learning experience.
-----> There have been times I knew "...I should have done this or that." Somehow I never did get around to it. But like you, I have tried things and have had to learn on my own. Sometimes I get to thinking to myself, "What are the worse possible things that can go wrong?" But I do admit that I'm not mechanical or technical. At one time I regretted it. Thank goodness for solid friends who pointed out there are a lot of things that I do professionally that are important to others. They tell me frequently that they can't do the things I do. I get comfort from that. Thanks for sharing. :Smile2:
 

Roybrew

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Put some latches on my wannigan yesterday.
It's a little tall in the canoe, but it'll do untill I can make a fancy one with matching wood strip pattern.
Holds everything, essential, I need for a quick camping trip, of course there's more stuff then I really need, but I don't get in to roughing it. Got to make an inventory list. I'll never forget the time I forgot my sleeping bag.... That was awful.
 

Northern Dancer

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...a canoe trunk, how clever, and well constructed as I can see. You just didn't purchase one - you made it, making it all the more personal. Yes, I'm very much into lists and have one for each trip and adventure. When you are on the water it's a long way back to pick up one sort of thing or another that you have forgotten. I have camp boxes, as you know. They remain partly packed and ready to go. It saves a lot of time and energy. There are different sizes too - used mostly for base camp.

Goof "stuff" captain - the season is just about right for a new year of adventure.
 

Northern Dancer

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Roybrew

....I was thinking about you this afternoon. I took my canoe off the shed and gave it a quick examination. I was surprised to see little wear and tear from the winter snows. O, ya...today is the first day of spring. Anyway, I'll be sanding it down and adding some new leaf decals, and getting it ready for the summer albeit a tad earlier than normal. I gave away my large blue barrel and I realized today that I actually need it for the canoe. What to do? I looked at your creation and thought...gnaw - instead, I bought a large dog food plastic container for the canoe. It should work just as well without all that serious labour. But I have to admit your creation is certainly more creative than my idea.

2957
 

Roybrew

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Thank you, but yours is water proof and will fair better around moisture. Why'd you give away your barrel?

So are you going to sand the whole canoe?
 

Northern Dancer

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Thank you, but yours is waterproof and will fair better around moisture. Why'd you give away your barrel?

So are you going to sand the whole canoe?
=====> Good question. I have two small ones I use for inside a pack and found the bigger one being used less. A colleague said he wanted one so I gave the barrel to him. But then again, I think I was rationalizing my intention to purchase something else that I thought would be more interesting and possibly helpful. The containers come in various shapes and sizes and because there isn't anything on them I'm at liberty to decorate them with my logos and words of wisdom. They are air-tight and waterproof.

There is some peeling and some nicks on my Souris River Prospector and to improve the appearance and to usher in spring I thought I would give it a complete "facelift". Sanding is the biggest job because coating it doesn't take any time at all.
 

Roybrew

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I've thought about getting a barrel, but don't know if I would use one enough. So after you fine sand your canoe, what do you use to re-coat it with? I've been meaning to do mine because it has some fine scratches on the bottom. Doesn't seem like it takes much to scratch one.
 

Northern Dancer

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I've thought about getting a barrel, but don't know if I would use one enough. So after you fine sand your canoe, what do you use to re-coat it with? I've been meaning to do mine because it has some fine scratches on the bottom. Doesn't seem like it takes much to scratch one.
=====> The manufacturer recommends polyurethane [clear]. When I've used this product I found that it drys quickly and retains its shine. Normally, we don't paint canoes but when you have one as old as mine it needs an uplift from time to time. The manufacturer also sells the decals and I will be replacing them this year. I have an extra light Kevlar so I'm using 120-220 grit sandpaper with the sander.

In regards to the barrel - I use an olive barrel for my pack. Our large grocery store use to throw them out on a regular basis so I would just stop by and pick them up. The entire crew has two or three on hand. When management got wind of what I was doing they began to charge five bucks a barrel. Still really cheap considering. It keeps my clothing and valuables completely dry without waterproofing each item.

It's a sunny day in our neck of the woods and the temperatures are climbing today - I'm cleaning up the back of the property and just enjoying the sunshine. Our Covid shutdowns are being eased and people are doing some odd things.
 

Roybrew

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That's what I was thinking they recommend was 220 grit for finish sanding. After I fiberglassed my canoe it had issues with amine blush. I had to do some major scotch Brite and soapy water scrubbing to get rid of it before I could apply the polyurethane. I think I did finish sand with 220 grit. To fine of grit and poly may not adhere as well. I used Spar Gloss polyurethane applied with a 4" foam roller. Then after 3 coats I rubbed it down with 0000 steel wool.

Wife and I got our first covid vaccine yesterday. I'm glad my mask covered my ouchie look. I'm a wuss.
 
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