Tomahawks v Axes?

Barney

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One big advantage of Ts is that they have lighter heads than axes which makes then more comfortable to use for finer tasks yet they still have enough handle length - heft for chopping.
 

oldsarge

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Just asking here.....weren't tomahawks primarily designed to be a weapon, where as an ax was designed to handle bigger work jobs. I pretty much agree with the past few post.
 

Pathfinder1

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Hi...


I used to carry a tomahawk, but I found that its uses were limited. The axe I carried in my vehicle was far more useful. I've had to use it a few times to clear branches and trees from trails/roads.

I also used to carry a hatchet, but subsequently realized that my machete was better suited to my needs. A shingling hatchet did come in handy a few times, though.
 

dinosaur

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Just asking here.....weren't tomahawks primarily designed to be a weapon, where as an ax was designed to handle bigger work jobs. I pretty much agree with the past few post.
I think you may be correct but a good double-bitted axe makes a hell of a good weapon for in fighting.
 

wvbreamfisherman

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A shingling hatchet is about as light as I'd go for any sort of wood chopping. I use a Miner's Axe Amazon.com: True Temper Wood Buddy Miner's Axe 1190500: Patio, Lawn & Garden , which is a decent compromise on a full-sized axe. I spent some time reshaping the cheeks and refining the edge (which was way too blunt) on the one I had.

The tomahawk was basically a fighting tool that had some utility as a chopping tool, not the other way around. I'd think a machete would be a lot more useful bush craft tool than a tomahawk.
 

Barney

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But they can still chop better when compared to any knife. And using a two pound axe head for finer tasks will tire your hand very quickly.
 

Grandpa

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This thread got me wondering so I went axe shopping. It amazes me the things they dream up to try and get people to buy. Most of it would be pure junk in practical usage.
 

Pathfinder1

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Grandpa;
This thread got me wondering so I went axe shopping. It amazes me the things they dream up to try and get people to buy. Most of it would be pure junk in practical usage.




Hi...


There are sure a lot of different ones out there now. The only type I didn't see on the Amazon site was the Nessmuk short-handled double-bitted axe.
 

Pathfinder1

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Grandpa;

This thread got me wondering so I went axe shopping. It amazes me the things they dream up to try and get people to buy. Most of it would be pure junk in practical usage.




Hi...


There certainly are a lot of different kinds out there.

About the only one I didn't see on the Amazon site was Nessmuk's short-handled double-bitted axe.
 

ppine

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I have a collection of axes and adzes and enjoy using them for short periods of time. I have one tomahawk for historical reinactments. The hawk is okay for shaping and fine work, but too light for much cutting.

For fires I like a kindling axe of splitting maul. I tend to use large pieces of wood and shove them in the fire as they burn. I don't like big fires. Too much work and too much heat. One of my pet peeves is a big circle of rocks. Then you can't feel the heat, get close or have access to coals. The first thing I do with a large rock ring is remove half of it and throw the rocks in the brush. That is how you will know that I have been there.
 

Pathfinder1

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ppine;
One of my pet peeves is a big circle of rocks. Then you can't feel the heat, get close or have access to coals. The first thing I do with a large rock ring is remove half of it and throw the rocks in the brush. That is how you will know that I have been there.




Hi...


Kind of like a modern day Daniel Boone, eh...??:tinysmile_fatgrin_t:tinysmile_fatgrin_t
 

ghostdog

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I have three sizes of Granfors Bruks axes from the Mini to the Wildlife to the Small Forest Axe. Those forged Swedish axes will cut. For long foot travel, the lightest tool you can take means more comfort while afoot. If your style is close to the vehicle then take full sized tools all the time. Smaller axes are more accurate but bigger ones do eat wood much faster.

As far as fires, I like mine small too. I leave the front open and if it is cold I build up the back of the structure to reflect more heat. Oblong will allow you to burn some wood while cooking over coals at the other end.



Most of the time I never use an axe and break wood with hands or with feet but when using a small rock structure and wrist sized wood a small saw works best if the wood is tough. I like the Bahco Laplander. It cuts through wood fast. If it needs any splitting, a Mora and baton will do the job.



In the north woods, some place really cold with snow or in the very wet climates, a good axe will be cherished.

I have a Lee Reeves tomahawk that does not quite get it. My Granfors Bruks Mini blows it away and the Wildlife is a serious tool. If I really want a working axe, the Small Forest Axe sees the most use of all of them. It can be used one or two handed and the head has enough heft to do some real work and some real damage. The small saw is a much safer tool. It’s a lot lighter and more compact too.
 

dinosaur

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One of my pet peeves is a big circle of rocks. Then you can't feel the heat, get close or have access to coals. The first thing I do with a large rock ring is remove half of it and throw the rocks in the brush. That is how you will know that I have been there.
Next time I'm out and see a campsite with a crescent moon on the ground as opposed to being carved into a door, I'll know who to thank.
 

ChadTower

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Just asking here.....weren't tomahawks primarily designed to be a weapon, where as an ax was designed to handle bigger work jobs. I pretty much agree with the past few post.

Not really. They were designed to do the same things as a hatchet. The comparison is awkward because the axe is not the right tool here.
 

Judy Ann

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One big advantage of Ts is that they have lighter heads than axes which makes then more comfortable to use for finer tasks yet they still have enough handle length - heft for chopping.
A few backpackers told me that they used to carry a tomahawk, but never used it so they quit carrying one. Mine is a great conversation starter, a potential weapon, but I am scared of using it to split wood. No one messes with me though!

I carry a hatchet in the car, but both are fairly worthless to me for wood chopping due to short handle length, personal strength limitations, and poor eye hand coordination...leading to safety concerns. I keep practicing but lately have had more success in a shorter period of time using a long knife and a big rock. :tinysmile_hmm_t:
 
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Grandpa

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A few backpackers told me that they used to carry a tomahawk, but never used it so they quit carrying one. Mine is a great conversation starter, a potential weapon, but I am scared of using it to split wood. No one messes with me though!

I carry a hatchet in the car, but both are fairly worthless to me for wood chopping due to short handle length, person strength limitations, and poor eye hand coordination...leading to safety concerns. I keep practicing but lately have had more success in a shorter period of time using a long knife and a big rock. :tinysmile_hmm_t:
Judy, the Boy Scouts have age limits on using an axe/hatchet/hawk. The boys are not allowed to swing an axe. They are taught to raise the wood with the axe, then bring them down together to split wood. (I think it is almost as dangerous that way as swinging but then I was taught early to swing.) Anyway, you might try that method for splitting your wood.
 
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