Camping is intense :-)

Northern Dancer

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Carrying on the little series for a Traditional Scouting Association I was asked to say "a few words" about tents. Attached hereto are my primary notes. At the time I demonstrated several tents and talked about the advantages and disadvantages of the same. This was of particular importance to the leadership as I stressed the absolute need to instruct, "Putting up a Tent" and other "bits of information" that is helpful. So often I see youth [and others] going at the task all wrong and getting little or no direction. Sound familiar.


Tents.png
 

Grandpa

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Just athought, I'm not sure i like that stove in a tent with a bunch of boys who fed on beanie weenie or chili mac just before bedtime. Lol. :Caked:On a more serious note, our charter is church sponsored so we have multiple units using the equipment. All equipment is stored and packed into a 16 foot cargo trailer. The boy scouts are in charge of that trailer. We went through several styles of tents finally settling on springbar and Kodiak tents. Every time that trailer is used and returned to the scouts, all the tents are pitched again and inspected for damages. This way the scouts learn how to pitch and care for the equipment at an early age. Our young men take great pride in always having that trailer full of gear in top shape. The girls are not as careful but the ribbing they get from the boys has made for a lot of improvements.
 

Northern Dancer

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Just athought, I'm not sure i like that stove in a tent with a bunch of boys who fed on beanie weenie or chili mac just before bedtime. Lol. :Caked:On a more serious note, our charter is church sponsored so we have multiple units using the equipment. All equipment is stored and packed into a 16 foot cargo trailer. The boy scouts are in charge of that trailer. We went through several styles of tents finally settling on springbar and Kodiak tents. Every time that trailer is used and returned to the scouts, all the tents are pitched again and inspected for damages. This way the scouts learn how to pitch and care for the equipment at an early age. Our young men take great pride in always having that trailer full of gear in top shape. The girls are not as careful but the ribbing they get from the boys has made for a lot of improvements.
-----> A 16-foot cargo trailer? It sure sounds like an awful lot of equipment Granpa. I'm happy to hear that the equipment is taken care of too. It could just be my attitude but it seems to me that a lot of groups aren't doing what your youth are doing. Could be that it isn't the fault of the youth but rather the leadership and the example set. So...that's why they call me "Mr. Tidybow" when it comes to keeping the campsite squeaky clean and tidy. :Unsure:
 

Grandpa

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-----> A 16-foot cargo trailer? It sure sounds like an awful lot of equipment Granpa. I'm happy to hear that the equipment is taken care of too. It could just be my attitude but it seems to me that a lot of groups aren't doing what your youth are doing. Could be that it isn't the fault of the youth but rather the leadership and the example set. So...that's why they call me "Mr. Tidybow" when it comes to keeping the campsite squeaky clean and tidy. :Unsure:
That trailer is equipped for three patrols. It has 3 -10 ft folding banquet tables along one wall. 9 10 x 14 tents, 2 for each patrol, three for leaders. Three camp chef stoves with 6 20 lb. Propane jugs, 6 -12 inch Dutch ovens, and three chests each with various pots, pans, and utensils. Three smaller chests for basic condiments, towels, etc. Each patrol has 2 large coolers for their food. Each patrol plans their own menus and is responsible for feeding their guests (leaders) who are divided and rotate each day. Everything is anchored around the edges with personal gear in the center. They use every bit of that 16 feet. This is ranch country so we have plenty of heavy trucks to pull that trailer.
 

Northern Dancer

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That trailer is equipped for three patrols. It has 3 -10 ft folding banquet tables along one wall. 9 10 x 14 tents, 2 for each patrol, three for leaders. Three camp chef stoves with 6 20 lb. Propane jugs, 6 -12 inch Dutch ovens, and three chests each with various pots, pans, and utensils. Three smaller chests for basic condiments, towels, etc. Each patrol has 2 large coolers for their food. Each patrol plans their own menus and is responsible for feeding their guests (leaders) who are divided and rotate each day. Everything is anchored around the edges with personal gear in the center. They use every bit of that 16 feet. This is ranch country so we have plenty of heavy trucks to pull that trailer.
-----> That's fantastic - there is nothing as great to get the camp spirit up than a group of enthusiastic youth. When I was in youth leadership we had this one group that had a mini school bus. They also had a trailer, though not as big as the one you mention, and a lead van. The first time I met them the van shows up and the crew jumps out, takes out the lawnmower, cuts the grass, arranges the site. Then the trailer comes in and sets up the camp in military perfection. Then of course the bus comes in with sharply-dressed youth. I'm sort of standing there sheepishly as my motty crew debates where they are going to put the kitchen. :Whistling:
 

ppine

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Two traditional ideas that all Boy Scouts need to know about. One is a canvas wall tent with a stove. (or a Baker tent) I find them superior to the modern Cabela's nylon tents like an Alaknak. Canvas is warm, it breathes. It stands up to the wind and last if stored dry. My wall tent is 40 years old.

The second is the magic of a lean to with a fire in front. I like the Whelen design but a simple shelter can be made with a tarp. I have camped in the snow with one and been very comfortable.
 
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